Career Services Blog – New England Law

By Mo Chanmugham, Esq. That’s because most people find it hard to write about themselves. It’s an uncomfortable move to make, especially if you do not know what to say or you don’t want to appear to be your bragging about yourself. But the summary section is an important part of your profile which should not be overlooked. When recruiters, employers, clients, and co-workers are employing LinkedIn to find out more about you, the summary is your chance to inform them who you are and why you are someone they ought to need to get to know better. But with a blank or badly written overview you run the chance of making a negative first impression and shedding a chance to your rivals.

Last week, A talk was given by me at the Boston Bar Association about how to optimize your LinkedIn profile. To get ready, I reviewed the summaries of popular LinkedIn Influencers to see what these were doing right. I used to be surprised to discover that they were utilizing a simple two-step framework to create their summaries in a way that was clear and impressive without sounding boring or obnoxious. The best example was from Jeff Weiner, CEO of LinkedIn. He starts his summary with a description of what he could be doing now. He starts with his years of experience, his current role, and company. What does your current snapshot look like?

  • Monthly acknowledgement certificates and motivational card messages
  • Where Business Development Is Strong, IT REALLY IS Measured
  • Collected research from Adobe
  • Contact the Ohio Bureau of Workers’ Compensation
  • External file I/O
  • WR 121 – English Composition (4) OR Freshman Inquiry (UNST 100 level, 5, 5, 5)

Are you a law’s pupil? Where do you go to school? Which kind of law would you like to practice? What do you desire to do after you graduate? Are you a co-employee, in-house counsel, or solo practitioner? How long are you training? Where do you work? What area of law do you concentrate on?

What types of clients do you help? He shares his past encounters at other companies Then, concentrating on the high-level assignments and highlights mainly. Exactly what does your past appear to be? What do you need to do to legislation school prior? What other companies or companies have you worked for? What honors or awards have you received? What exactly are some major professional accomplishments you have achieved? If you want to really impress the reader and stand out from the audience, give them a feeling of who you are away from resume with the addition of some personal information to your overview. Tell them why you need to do what you do or what you really care about when it comes to your projects.

We are delighted to have John Morrison, Executive Director of the Institute for Human Rights and Business, speaking during the dinner. As a well-known and influential voice on business and human rights, and a participating and proficient speaker highly, John’s speech is a real highlight of the night. What’s the first best thing you can certainly do to mitigate source chain risk in 2016?

Look forward to viewing you there! Drop me an email if you’d like a 50% discount on the standard ticket price on registration. CSR consultant, Sustainability Reporter, HR Professional, Ice Cream Addict. Author of Understanding G4: the Concise Guide to Next Generation Sustainability Reporting AND Sustainability Reporting for SMEs: Competitive Advantage Through Transparency AND CSR for HR: A necessary partnership for evolving responsible business procedures. Need help writing your first / next Sustainability Report?